BOOKS & TEXT REFERENCES

VISIBLE ARCHIVE. Mitchell Whitelaw

Mitchell Whitelaw, an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Design at the University of Canberra. This blog began in 2009 as documentation of a research project on the visualisation of archival datasets, supported by the National Archives of Australia under the Ian Maclean Award. Now it documents his ongoing research into the exploratory display and visualisation of large cultural collections.

http://visiblearchive.blogspot.nl/

DIGITAL BAROQUE

 

 

A surprising and original application of theories of new media art

Making an exquisite and unexpected connection between the old and the new, Digital Baroque analyzes the philosophical paradigms that inform contemporary screen arts. Examining a wide range of art forms, Murray reflects on the rhetorical, emotive, and social forces inherent in the screen arts’ dialogue with early modern concepts.

OUT OF TIME.TODD MACGOWAN

A new temporal aesthetic in films such as Memento, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, 2046, and The Hangover

In Out of Time, Todd McGowan takes as his starting point the emergence of a temporal aesthetic in cinema that arose in response to the digital era. Linking developments in cinema to current debates within philosophy, McGowan claims that films that change the viewer’s relation to time constitute a new cinematic mode: atemporal cinema.

DOCUMENTARY TIME. MALIN WAHLBERG

An innovative theoretical reassessment of temporality in documentary films

Finding the theoretical space where cinema and philosophy meet, Malin Wahlberg’s sophisticated approach to the experience of documentary film aligns with attempts to reconsider the premises of existential phenomenology. Wahlberg discusses a corpus of classical and recent experiments in film and video in which creative approaches to the time of the image and the potential archive memory of filmic representation illuminates meanings of temporality and time experience.

CREATING THE WITNESS

Creating the Witness examines the role of film and the Internet in creating virtual witnesses to genocide over the past one hundred years. Leshu Torchin’s broad survey of media and the social practices around it investigates the development of popular understandings of genocide to achieve recognition and response, ultimately calling on viewers to act on behalf of human rights.

https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/creating-the-witness

http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/activistmedia/2012/12/creating-the-witness/

FIRST CHAPTER

https://www.scribd.com/fullscreen/117087845?access_key=key-2efhaj2kjwxlu252acc5&allow_share=true&escape=false&view_mode=scroll

DEJA VU. PETER KRAP

The pitfalls of cultural memory and forgetting, understood through the genealogy of the phenomenon called déjà vu

This provocative book examines the history of déjà vu, offers a counterpoint to clichéd celebrations of cultural memory and forces us do a double take on the warnings against forgetting common in our time. Reaching from the early texts of Sigmund Freud to the plays of Heiner Müller, this exploration of the effects of déjà vu pivots around the work of Walter Benjamin.

OFF THE NETWORK. ULISES ALÍ MEJÍAS

Off the Network is a fresh and authoritative examination of how the hidden logic of the Internet, social media, and the digital network is changing users’ understanding of the world—and why that should worry us. Ulises Ali Mejias suggests how we might begin to rethink the logic of the network and question its ascendancy.

 

https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/pdf/off-the-network